INQUIQUE

Working aboard a fish catcher processor at sea exposes crewmen to constant risk of injury. Crewmen working for even the best fishing companies, aboard some of the biggest boats in the fleet, sometimes suffer serious injuries that will leave them permanently damaged for the rest of their lives. When these injury accidents happen as a result of negligence or unseaworthiness, the crewman is entitled to compensation under federal maritime law. The employers of crewmen on fishing vessels, and the vessel owners, owe each of their crewmen a duty under maritime law to provide them with a safe place to work. Almost all accidents aboard fishing vessels at sea are preventable if proper safety precautions are followed.

The maritime attorneys at Stacey & Jacobsen, PLLC focus their practice on representing injured fishermen, fish processors, deckhands, and seamen. They have successfully represented thousands of injured fishermen and seamen. The firm's lawyers have represented crewmen's families in landmark cases such as the sinkings of the catcher processors Alaska Ranger, Aleutian Enterprise, Arctic Rose and Katmai. The firm's lawyers are licensed in Alaska, Oregon, and Washington. Their reputation is built on a history of success representing injured crewmen in Jones Act negligence and unseaworthiness claims. From years of practice, the firm knows how accidents happen aboard fishing vessels and how injuries can be prevented.

We Can Help

If you have been injured working as a crewman, deckhand, or fish processor aboard a vessel associated with Iquique U.S. LLC, you should contact an experienced maritime lawyer to learn about your rights to compensation under the Jones Act and federal maritime law. In almost all cases, an injured worker is entitled to maintenance and cure, regardless of whose fault the accident was. Under the maintenance and cure doctrine, reasonable medical bills must be paid for by the employer, and the seaman is entitled to a living allowance while recovering from injuries.

Iquique is headquartered in Seattle, Washington, and assists in the operations of five large head and gut catcher processors working in the Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska. The fishing vessels are F/T ARICA (Arica Vessel LLC), F/T CAPE HORN (Cape Horn Vessel LLC), F/T REBECCA IRENE (Rebecca Irene Vessel LLC), F/T TREMONT (Tremont Vessel LLC), and F/T UNIMAK (Unimak Vessel LLC). The vessels fish for mackerel, flathead sole, cod, perch yellowfin sole, and rock sole. The vessel possesses a quota share under Amendment 80 rationalization regulations. These five vessels have valuable fishing rights and quotas.

The attorneys at Stacey & Jacobsen, PLLC do not represent Iquique, nor any of the owners of the vessels ARICA, CAPE HORN, TREMONT, UNIMAK, REBECCA IRENE, nor their insurance carriers.

Learn More About Your Rights

If you have been injured working aboard a fishing vessel in Alaska, Washington, or Oregon, don't guess about your rights to compensation under the maritime law, or trust the fishing company or their insurance company to tell you what is fair. If you have been injured aboard a fishing vessel through negligence or unseaworthiness, you should be fully informed of your rights to compensation by an experienced maritime lawyer that has your best interest in mind.

Maritime law is unique and complex. Handling serious injury accidents for fishermen injured aboard fishing vessels requires specialized skill and knowledge. The maritime lawyers at Stacey & Jacobsen, PLLC have handled thousands of fishing accident cases for injured crewmen. Contact us for a free initial consultation. We are committed to getting fair compensation for our clients who have been injured as the result of negligence or unseaworthiness.

Our Successes
$16,000,000 - Jury Verdict for Ferry Worker Injury Gangway Collapse
$4,200,000 - Wrongful Death Judgment for longshoreman killed by unsafe cargo container stow.
$4,000,000 - Jones Act Maritime Wrongful Death
$4,000,000 - Burn Injuries Fire and explosion in engine room of fishing vessel.
$3,500,000 - Brain Injury Tug boat deckhand injured by defect in barge’s crane.
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