Fisherman injuries

Maritime Post-Traumatic Stress

Post-Traumatic Stress in Crewmen Following the Sinking of Their Vessels - Jones Act Injury Claims For Psychological Injuries, PTSD, Depression & Anxiety

Crewmen involved in the sinking of their vessels at sea can suffer severe emotional fright and distress that can lead to development of post-traumatic stress, anxiety disorders, or depression. In almost all cases, under Federal Maritime Law crewmen are entitled to maintenance and cure benefits when they become injured or ill while working aboard ship, tugs, barges, and fishing vessels. Under the maintenance and cure doctrine, an employer is required to pay for all reasonable and necessary medical expenses related to the accident or injury. This includes psychological treatment and psychiatric treatment in cases involving post-traumatic stress following the sinking of a vessel.

Seamen are tough, hard-working men and women, but when a ship sinks and they have lost crewmates and nearly died themselves, they need help coping with the aftermath. Psychological injuries can be just as disabling, and impact the injured crewman’s life as severely, as a bodily injury. It is important for crewmen suffering from PTSD to get psychological and medical help for their injuries. Early treatment leads to a better chance of recovery. Crewmen who suffer severe disabling injuries aboard a ship at sea can also develop depression and anxiety disorders.

Rights to Compensation for PTSD and Psychological Injuries Under the Jones Act

Crewmen who are injured by negligence or unseaworthiness are entitled to compensation under the Jones Act and Federal Maritime Law. Damages under maritime law may compensate the crewman for lost wages, lost wage earning capacity, pain and suffering, disability, and future medical expenses. In some cases, psychological injuries can leave a crewman unable to return to work at sea and result in life-long psychological consequences.

If you or a loved one is suffering any of the following symptoms after a serious injury accident or near-death experience at sea, they should be evaluated by a psychologist or psychiatrist for possible PTSD. Some symptoms of PTSD are: Flashbacks; nightmares; feelings of detachment or estrangement from family and friends; diminished interest in normal life activities; sense of hopelessness; difficulty falling asleep; irritability and outbursts of anger; difficulty concentrating; hypervigilance; and, exaggerated startle response.

Stacey & Jacobsen, LLP is one of the most experienced maritime personal injury law firms in the Nation. They have been helping injured seamen and fishermen recover from catastrophic injuries and near-death accidents for more than 20 years. They have helped clients who have suffered burns, amputations, and chronic pain to get the psychological and psychiatric care they need to help them recover from their injuries. Stacey & Jacobsen, LLP has helped surviving crewmen from fishing vessel sinkings get compensation for post-traumatic disorders.

Stacey & Jacobsen, LLP has represented families and crewmen in many fishing vessel sinking cases including the Alaska Ranger, Arctic Rose, Aleutian Enterprise, Galaxy, Katmai, Pacific Apollo, Pace Setter, Lin J and many others. They understand working at sea. They know how accidents happen at sea, and understand how those accidents can be prevented. They have recovered millions of dollars in compensation for clients suffering from psychological injuries.

Stacey & Jacobsen, LLP is licensed to practice law in Alaska, Washington, and Oregon. Their clients are located throughout the Nation. For a free initial consultation about your maritime injury claim, contact us at 1-877-332-5529.

Our Successes
$16,000,000 - Jury Verdict for Ferry Worker Injury Gangway Collapse
$4,200,000 - Wrongful Death Judgment for longshoreman killed by unsafe cargo container stow.
$4,000,000 - Jones Act Maritime Wrongful Death
$4,000,000 - Burn Injuries Fire and explosion in engine room of fishing vessel.
$3,500,000 - Brain Injury Tug boat deckhand injured by defect in barge’s crane.
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